Frequently asked questions for colleagues

We will keep updating this page as often as we can to keep you informed. 

Please note that due to the unpredictable nature of the coronavirus, Pinnacle may need to review its position in respect of these matters and in line with any Government or other official advice or guidance. 

You will understand that we are unable to address and answer every different scenario and question that may arise. If you have and further queries please contact your line manager or HR in the first instance. 

We urge colleagues to follow the guidance and good practice which is widely available in order to help safeguard both themselves and others. 


Latest update: 11:00, 27th November 2020         Recent updates are marked with a bell ()

Health and Safety Policies

Our Health and Safety policies and documents regarding Coronavirus are available for all staff to view at the link below. These include our Toolbox Talks and Risk Assessments.

Following the Government’s recent announcements, from the 5th November England will be entering new national restrictions.  It is vital that we all follow the Government rules and guidelines to ensure the health, safety and well-being of our colleagues, customers, clients and business partners.

Read the Government’s full guidance here. 

Attending your Place of Work

To help contain the virus, everyone who can work effectively from home must do so.

For all of our front line members of staff that are continuing to go to work because they are not able to carry out their duties from home, nothing changes. We need you to continue carrying out the vital work you have been doing since the start of this crisis, supporting communities across the country. Our existing ways of working as outlined in our Toolbox Talks and Risk Assessments (available here) continue to be safe and in line with Government and Public Health Guidelines.

In accordance with relevant site-specific COVID secure risk assessments, our depots and site offices will therefore remain open, but restrictions, including social distancing, will need to apply.

Our main offices will also remain open but should only be used by colleagues unable to effectively fulfil their work duties from home.

Working Safely

The risk of transmission can be substantially reduced if COVID secure guidelines are followed closely. We have developed comprehensive and COVID-19 controls for each of our work environments which must be adhered to wherever possible.

There is no limit to group size when meeting or gathering for essential work purposes, but social distancing, wherever possible.

To ensure that our workplaces are COVID secure for those who need to use them, in line with the Government guidance here, risk assessments have been carried out and shared with staff who may be needing to use that facility, modifications (such as increased sanitation facilities, increased/amended cleaning regimes, one way or queueing systems to ensure social distancing, decommissioning desks, reduced meeting room availability, screens, signage etc) have been completed in accordance with those risk assessments, and COVID secure certificates issued, indicating the maximum number of people that can be accommodated in that office or site at any one time.

Subject to client agreement in relation to specific contracts, visitors to our own offices, depots and site offices will not be permitted. This means all external appointments should be carried out remotely.

Coronavirus and your Wellbeing

As news about Coronavirus (COVID-19) dominates the headlines and public concern is on the rise, we would like to remind staff that taking care of your mental health is just as important as looking after your physical health.

There is some excellent advice at the following links:

Mind – Coronavirus and your Wellbeing

You can also contact the Employee Assistance Programme which is open 24/7 on 0800 030 5182 or using the web details below:

Health Assured – Employee Assistance Programme

User name: Pinnacle
Password: Pinnacle

Don’t forget the guidance on working from home as below

IT Guidance

Health and Safety – Working from Home Guidance

HR Guidance for Staff

HR Guidance for Managers

Keeping up to date

Due to the unprecedented and unpredictable nature of coronavirus we will continue to update these FAQs to reflect current circumstances. Please continue to check the intranet and maintain regular contact with line managers and colleagues during this time.

We appreciate these are very challenging circumstances, please be assured that our employees and customers remain our main priority at this time.

As the situation develops so rapidly, we are using this page as our main source of information for staff. We are updating it frequently.

We will also email you directly with significant updates that will impact you. Read our regular Corporate Communications for important updates.

Keep up to date externally 

You can follow Government and other public authorities to stay up to date.

Most have social media accounts and email update facilities.

These include:

Public Health England– a UK governmental organisation that protects the nation’s health and wellbeing.

UK Government

NHS

World Health Organisation

The main source of information from Pinnacle is found on our “Frequently asked questions for staff” page on our website.  This gets updated regularly.  A link has been sent to all staff either via their work email, or their personal email address held on Cascade.  Please check your Cascade record, and if your personal email address is no longer valid, then please amend your Cascade record, and you will receive the link next time an update is posted.

Pay

Anyone who continues to carry out their role, whether from home or on site, will continue to receive their normal full pay.

If you are required to self-isolate in accordance with Government guidelines, you will be paid your normal full pay, whether that be because you have symptoms yourself, a member of your household or support bubble is showing symptoms, you have been identified by the NHS as a contact of someone who has had a positive test for coronavirus, or you (or your child) needs to self-isolate prior to attending hospital for a procedure.  In addition, if you are a member of the extremely vulnerable group, you will be advised by the NHS whether you need to shield, and you will be paid for the duration of your instruction to shield.

In addition, anyone who is hospitalised due to contracting the virus or who is absent from work unwell with a confirmed case of coronavirus following an NHS test, will also be paid their normal full pay.

The above does not apply to people who travel abroad and then subsequently are required to self-isolate upon their return to the UK.  In this case, you will be required to take unpaid leave, or paid annual leave if you have any entitlement remaining.

The Government’s Job Retention Scheme is being extended to the end of March 2021 for any staff that are ‘furloughed’.  The Government will cover 80% of basic wages and Pinnacle will continue to make up the difference to 100% for all employees with a basic wage of up to £37,500 per annum.

Unfortunately, we are not able to bring forward “pay day” timing during these challenging times –  or to increase frequency to weekly pay –  for the reason that our clients are not paying us any sooner. We continue to be paid fee income at the end of each month and it is from this fee income that we pay wages.

Confirmed COVID case(s) at work

If the member of staff is not already self-isolating, they should be sent home from work immediately. The member of staff will receive guidance from the NHS with their test result, which will be to self-isolate, and to contact the NHS if their symptoms worsen. The Manager should record the test result on Cascade.

The Manager should establish the following ;

  • When the test was undertaken
  • When the member of staff last attended work and where
  • Who would the member of staff have come into contact with (colleagues, members of the client, customers, members of the public)

If the member of staff is likely to have come into contact with anyone else, the Manager should liaise with their line Manager to judge who should be advised. You should only be advising people who are directly affected, ie if they should know because of potential implications for their own health, or due to a duty of care they may have towards others (other employees, customers or members of the public). Follow the Information Commissioner Office’s guidance that “you should keep staff informed about cases in your organisation. Remember, you probably don’t need to name individuals and you shouldn’t provide more information than necessary. You have an obligation to ensure the health and safety of your employees, as well as a duty of care. Data protection doesn’t prevent you doing this.” The same is true about whether you would need to advise clients.

In accordance with the Government’s advice;

  • Closing the workplace: There is no requirement to close a workplace, although if the member of staff has been at work in the 3 days preceding the test result, the work place will need to be cleaned. The cleaning should be carried out either by an in-house team, if we are responsible for cleaning on that site, or by the usual contractor. There is no need for specialist contractors to be employed.
  • Self-isolation: There is no need for everyone within that workplace to self-isolate. People only need to self-isolate if they have been advised by the authorities that they are a close contact of someone who has tested positive.  The decision on who is a close contact is made by the authorities in liaison with the person who has tested positive.
    • Other than in a school setting, people are only required to self-isolate if they have been contacted by NHS Test and Trace and are advised that they are a close contact of someone at work. If you haven’t been contacted by the NHS, you can attend work as normal. The full guidance is available here, and here.

In a school setting or working in a school bubble, the process is different.  If you are advised by a school to self-isolate, or work in a school bubble and have Covid 19 symptoms or have tested positive for Covid 19, you should contact your Manager before attending work.  Your Manager will liaise with the school and the NHS Business Services Authority for guidance on whether self-isolation for yourself and colleagues is required.

The Manager should contact our Health & Safety Manager, John Butcher (or the Health & Safety team in his absence), who will alert Public Health England.  Public Health England will then advise on any actions required.

Illness and Self Isolation

If you have symptoms

If you have any of the symptoms of coronavirus below you should be self-isolating. Initially, the advice was to self-isolate for 7 days, but this was increased to 10 days with effect from the end of July 2020.

  • high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you’ve noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

Most people with coronavirus have at least one of these symptoms.

There is guidance on what you can do to obtain a test in the “Testing” section.

If a member of your household or someone in your support bubble is showing symptoms

If a member of your household is showing symptoms, you should be self-isolating for 14 days.  More guidance is available at NHS online.

There is more detailed guidance here – on how the timing works with regard to self-isolating due to household members or someone in your support bubble showing symptoms.  Importantly, there is no need to restart the 14 day period if new members of your household / support bubble display symptoms, as the 14 days run from when the first person in the household showed symptoms.  Similarly, it would be very unusual for circumstances to arise where consecutive periods of 14 days would be required.

If you are identified by the NHS as a contact of someone who has had a positive test for coronavirus

You should also self-isolate if you are advised by the NHS (by text or email, but the NHS will follow up by phone if they don’t get a response) that you have been in contact with someone who has had a positive test for coronavirus. Each time someone tests positive for coronavirus, they will be asked to provide contact details (where they know them) for people with whom they have been in contact in the 48 hours before they developed symptoms. You will not be told who the person is who has identified you as a contact. You will be identified as a contact of someone who has tested positive if;

  • you have had face-to-face contact with that person (less than 1 metre away, however short the timescale)
  • you have spent more than 15 minutes within 2 metres of that person
  • you have travelled in a car or other small vehicle, or on a plane with that person (even on a short journey)
  • you work in, or have recently visited, a setting where that person has been present (for example a GP surgery, a school, or an indoor workplace such as an office)

You may be feeling well and not have any symptoms, but it is still essential for to follow the advice that you are given.  This is because, if you have been infected, you could be infectious to others at any point up to 14 days.  Some people infected with the virus don’t show any symptoms at all, and it is therefore crucial to self-isolate to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus.  If you do not have symptoms, you do not need to seek a test, as the scientific evidence shows that the test may not be able to detect whether you have the virus.

If you live with other people, and they have not been identified as a contact in the same way, they do not need to self-isolate (unless you develop symptoms) but they should avoid contact with you as far as possible and follow advice on hygiene. Self-isolation means staying at home and not going outside your home at any time.  If you do not live with other people, or everyone in the household has been advised to self-isolate, you should seek help from others, or delivery services, for essential activities such as food shopping.

If you are advised by the NHS that you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive, you should contact your manager.  You will be required to provide evidence of the text or email from the NHS, which will be logged on Cascade.

The full guidance can be found here and here.

If you are required by the NHS to self-isolate for 14 days prior to you or your child undergoing a procedure or operation.

As outlined in the “Pay” section, anyone who is required to self-isolate, regardless of whether they are able to carry out their role during the period of self-isolation, will be paid their normal full pay. This does not apply to people who travel abroad and then subsequently are required to self-isolate upon their return to the UK.  In this case, you will be required to take unpaid leave, or paid annual leave if you have any entitlement remaining.

If you are required to self-isolate, you should discuss the practicalities of working from home (if you are not doing so already) with your line manager.  If your role is such that it is possible to carry it out from home, or if new arrangements can be put in place that allow you to work from home, then yes you will be able, and expected, to work from home.

Yes. Staff should notify their line manager in accordance with the normal sickness absence reporting procedures, whatever the nature of their illness.

People should not attend work if a member of their household is showing symptoms of the coronavirus.  They should stay at home and, if they are at work, be sent home immediately.  There is no need for the place of work to be deep cleaned.

People should not attend work if a member of their household is showing symptoms of the coronavirus.  They must stay at home and, if they come to work, be sent home immediately. They are not able to refuse, it is a Government instruction.

Yes, you must send them home.  People are required to self-isolate if they are showing symptoms.

No.  There is no need for you to self-isolate, and you should continue to attend work.  You only need to self-isolate if your child is showing symptoms herself.

Vulnerable groups

There are two classifications of vulnerable.  The extremely vulnerable (see next section) are those people who will have been contacted by the NHS and instructed to shield during the first wave, and from the 5 November 2020 onwards.  There is no requirement to shield if you are a member of a vulnerable group.

Vulnerable groups are those who are:

  • aged 70 or older (regardless of medical conditions)
  • under 70 with an underlying health condition listed below (that is, anyone instructed to get a flu jab each year on medical grounds):
    • chronic (long-term) mild to moderate respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
    • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
    • chronic kidney disease
    • chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis
    • chronic neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), or cerebral palsy
    • diabetes
    • a weakened immune system as the result of certain conditions or medicines they are taking (such as steroid tablets)
  • being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)
  • pregnant women

If you fall into a vulnerable category (as above) you must follow Government guidance on social distancing and hygiene stringently, stay at home as much as possible and, if you do have to go out, take particular care to minimise contact with others outside your household.

You should also advise your line Manager and discuss the possibility of working from home either in your current or in an alternative role.  If that is not possible, your manager should attempt to arrange your working pattern to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  You should be offered the option of the safest on-site roles, enabling you to stay 2m away from others.

We should attempt to take his concerns into account if at all possible.  Firstly, we should examine the possibility of working from home.  If that is not possible, then we should attempt to arrange his working pattern to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  In common with everybody else, he should continue to pay particular heed to the social distancing and hygiene advice.

In common with all vulnerable groups, the Government advice is for people in these categories to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.

You should also advise your line Manager, who will record you as a vulnerable person on Cascade.  You should discuss the possibility of working from home either in your current or in an alternative role.  If that is not possible, your manager should attempt to arrange your working pattern to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  You should be offered the option of the safest on-site roles, enabling you to stay 2m away from others.

Extremely vulnerable groups

If you are in this group, you will have previously received a letter or text from the NHS or from your GP advising you to shield.  You will also have received a second letter from Government setting out detailed advice on what to do while the second national lockdown restrictions are in place, from the 5 November 2020 to the 1 December 2020.  During this period, CEV colleagues are advised to work from home.  Any CEV colleague whose work role does not allow them to work effectively from home will receive full pay for the duration of the new restrictions.  You will not be allowed to attend work, in line with Government advice.  Please see Governments full guidance for this period here

From 2 December 2020, CEV colleagues will once more be able to return to work.  Everyone is currently advised to work from home where possible.  However, if you cannot work from home, you can now go to work in all tiers.

The full guidance from the 2 December onwards is here.  This guidance offers additional advice to the clinically extremely vulnerable over and above the rules for the tiers, which apply to everyone. This guidance aims to strike a better balance between providing practical steps to help keep you safe while reducing some of the potentially harmful impacts on mental and social wellbeing that were associated with previous strict shielding. It sets out the steps clinically extremely vulnerable people can take to protect themselves for each local tier.

In the future, the government will only reintroduce formal shielding advice in the very worst affected local areas and for a limited period of time. This will only apply to some, but not all, Tier 3 areas and will be based on advice from the Chief Medical Officer. The government will write to you separately to inform you if you are advised to shield. You are not advised to follow formal shielding advice again unless you receive a new shielding notification advising you to do so.  If you do receive a new shielding notification, you should advise your Manager.  Anyone that is required to shield in these circumstances will receive full pay.

If you live with someone who has received a letter from the NHS stating that they are one of the extremely vulnerable people, you are not required to adopt the protective shielding measures for yourself. You should follow the social distancing guidelines particularly stringently when out of the house, and the shielding guidelines when at home.

The advice is that someone who lives with an extremely vulnerable person does not need to start shielding themselves in the same way, and so your team member is able to come to work.  However, he should follow the  particularly stringently when he’s out of the house, and the shielding guidelines when at home.

With regard to coming to work, in common with the response in the vulnerable groups section, we should attempt to take your team member’s concerns into account if at all possible.  Firstly, we should examine the possibility of working from home.  If that is not possible, then we should attempt to arrange his working pattern to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  He should be offered the option of the safest on-site roles, enabling him to stay 2m away from others.

Concerns about coming to work

We should attempt to take into account the concerns of everyone if possible.  Firstly, we should examine the possibility of working from home.  If that is not possible, then we should attempt to arrange working patterns to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  We should all continue to pay heed to the hygiene and social distancing advice.

The government advice on what to do if a colleague were to contract coronavirus is also relevant here (see response to question above).

Yes. You should keep staff informed about cases in your organisation.  Remember, you shouldn’t name individuals and you shouldn’t provide more information than necessary. You have an obligation to ensure the health and safety of your employees, as well as a duty of care. Data protection doesn’t prevent you doing this.

There are no offices in Pinnacle that are completely closed.  However, in line with the Government’s guidance, where possible, people that can work from home are doing so.

Customer facing offices will remain open for business as they are essential to provide front line services to our customers.  If you are working in an office, then you should pay particular attention to the Government’s hygiene and social distancing advice, and do all you can to heed that advice while you are at work.  Risk assessments have now been carried out at all our offices and sites, and control measures identified that are necessary to ensure that our work places are COVID secure in line with the Government guidance here.  Those risk assessments have been shared with staff who may be needing to use that facility

We should attempt to take your team member’s concerns into account if at all possible.  Firstly, we should examine the possibility of working from home.  If that is not possible, then we should attempt to arrange his working pattern to minimise contact with others, when travelling to work and when at work, for example by staggering starting and finishing times.  In common with everybody else, he should continue to pay particular heed to the social distancing and hygiene advice.

Recording Coronavirus-related absences

The following categories are now being used to record absences relating to Coronavirus:

In the Absence (sickness) screen;

  • Coronavirus – hospitalised
  • Coronavirus – confirmed case (following an NHS test)

In the Absence (other coronavirus) screen, which is being used for all incidents of self-isolating;

  • Self-isolating 7 days mild symptoms – Working From Home (WFH)
  • Self-isolating 7 days mild symptoms – unable to WFH
  • Self-isolating 10 days mild symptoms – Working From Home (WFH)
  • Self-isolating 10 days mild symptoms – unable to WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days shared household/bubble symptoms – WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days shared household/bubble symptoms – unable to WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days contact of confirmed case – WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days contact of confirmed case – unable to WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days pre NHS procedure – WFH
  • Self-isolating 14 days pre NHS procedure – unable to WFH
  • Self-isolating as extremely vulnerable (following the receipt of the NHS letter or text) – WFH
  • Self-isolating as extremely vulnerable (following the receipt of the NHS letter or text) – unable to WFH

Detailed guidance has been issued to our Managers.  If you have any queries, please speak to your Line Manager in the first instance.

In line with government advice, we do not require a Fit Note.  However, you should be able to obtain one via the NHS online service.  It is our preference that you attempt to obtain a Fit note, but you will not be penalised if you cannot.

Leave

You may find that your team has taken fewer days leave this year than usual at this time of year.  This may because they have had to cancel leave that had been booked but they weren’t able to go due to COVID19, or because people have been reluctant to take leave when they are unable to go away.

At the moment we are not insisting that people take leave (although that is a position we may be forced to take if we find that people aren’t taking enough leave), but we are actively encouraging it, so we don’t end up with a backlog at the end of the year.

As much as anything, it’s important that people get regular rest from work, whether they are able to actually go away on holiday or not.  As restrictions gradually ease, people may feel more comfortable with going away on leave in any event.

So please encourage your teams to be taking regular leave (normal rules about restricting the number of people that are off at any one time still apply of course, as the service still needs to be delivered).  Set the example by taking annual leave yourself.

We have been actively encouraging people to take their annual leave since the lockdown has been relaxed, on the basis that it is important for people’s wellbeing and for company performance for people to take a break to rest and re-energise, to avoid burn-out and working ineffectively.  We are not, therefore, envisaging that there will be a large backlog of people that have unusually high levels of leave to take.

Under the rules of the Working Time Directive, people are required to take a minimum of 20 days’ leave in the annual leave year for the very reason above (rest and wellbeing), allowing carry over only for people who have an entitlement that is higher than 20 days.  That said, the Government has relaxed the provisions of the Working Time Directive to allow companies to in turn agree that individuals may carry over a maximum of 20 days to be taken in the next 2 annual leave years, on the strict condition that they have been prevented from taking leave by COVID19.

Again, we do not envisage that there will be that many situations where people have actually been ‘prevented’ from taking annual leave due to COVID19 (as opposed to choosing not to take leave due to the reduction in opportunities to travel), but recognise that there may be some.  Therefore, managers will have the discretion in exceptional cases to be able to agree that individuals can carry over more than 5 days.

Annual leave requests should be discussed and agreed with line managers in accordance with the standard process.

Employees are entitled to time off work to help someone who depends on them (a dependant) in an unexpected event or emergency.  This would apply to this situation.  The amount of time an employee takes to look after someone must be reasonable for the situation, to make arrangements to cover the emergency. There is no entitlement to pay for emergency time off for dependants. If you do need emergency time off, you must contact your Manager.

Cleaning services

We will ensure your safety by following Public Health England advice, adhering to our newly issued risk assessment and method statement, through the provision of the requisite Personal Protective Equipment and the provision of the correct equipment / tools to carry out the job safely. If we are unable to provide the PPE necessary to complete a task, we will not ask a member of staff to complete this task.

Our Contract and Area Managers are in regular communication with our clients and may agree to carry out deep cleans in line with our contractual obligations. If this is the case, staff should follow the latest risk assessment and method statement to carry out the clean. If we are not able to provide the PPE necessary to complete a task, we will not ask a member of staff to complete this task. Keeping our staff safe in this instance is no different than keeping our staff safe in our day to day operation.

We will be guided by the school/education authority in terms of declaring their premises safe. However, if, as a cleaner you were asked to clean the area you will need to follow all relevant risk assessments and method statements as outlined in the question above.

PPE is provided in line with Public Health England guidance. Task-specific PPE requirements are set out in our newly issued risk assessment and method statement. If we are unable to provide the PPE necessary to complete a task, we will not ask a member of staff to complete this task.

We will ensure staff are provided with the requisite PPE and tools to carry about such deep cleaning tasks as defined by Public Health England advice, adhering to our newly issued risk assessment and method statements. If we are unable to provide the PPE necessary to complete a task, we will not ask a member of staff to complete this task.

If you perceive that you have been asked to do something not in line with government guidance, please raise this with your line manager in the first instance.

Coronavirus Testing

Anyone with symptoms of coronavirus is now eligible to book a test.

The symptoms are:

  • a new, continuous cough
  • a high temperature, or
  • a loss of or change in their normal sense of smell or taste

All members of their household must also self-isolate according to current guidelines, unless the symptomatic individual receives a negative test result.

Do not delay, apply for a test as soon as you have symptoms, testing is most effective within 3 days of symptoms developing, and after 6 days it is too late.

Book a test by going here.

If you are registering for COVID-19 testing, please let your line manager know;

  • The date of your test
  • The result of your test

All communications about COVID-19 testing will be treated with confidentiality.

If you, or someone in your household, receive a positive test, you will be sent information and guidance by the NHS. If your test is negative, you can return to work.

Re-opening offices / increasing the number of staff in our offices, depots and other premises

Travel to and for work

The Government has issued this guidance on safer travelling.

The Government advice is to consider all other forms of transport before using public transport.  If you have to use public transport then, if you can, you should avoid peak times.  Speak to your manager about starting and finishing times.  The guidance suggests taking a less busy route and / or starting or ending your journey using a station or mode of transport you know to be quieter, for example walking the first or last mile of your journey.

From the 15 June 2020, it has been mandatory to wear face coverings on public transport

TFL have also issued some guidance about travel in London which talks about what they are doing to help passengers maintain social distancing and hygiene, and mentions;

  • the efforts they are making to maintain the cleanliness of the network with regular cleaning using hospital grade antiviral disinfectant
  • given the national requirement to maintain 2m distance between passengers wherever possible, they estimate that capacity will only be around 13 to 15% of normal, even when all services are back running
  • avoiding peak times – the busiest times on the network are 05:45 to 08:15 and 16:00 to 17:30 – they have provided a list of the busiest times and places on the Tube and Rail networks
  • if you can, walking or cycling for all or part of your journey, including to complete your journey if you travel into central London
  • following the measures TFL is introducing to enable social distancing of 2 metres where possible, which may involve you being asked to wait to enter a station, follow one way systems, or walk only on the left, and maintain social distancing throughout stations, for example on stairs, escalators and lifts
  • if travelling by bus, maintaining social distancing at stops and bus stations wherever possible, boarding the bus in the middle doors and using all available space, including the upper deck
  • the importance of following the Government advice on hygiene, and the need to wash your hands before and after travel, and carry hand sanitisers with you

The guidance remains that “if you can do your job from home you should continue to do so”. You would only need to return to your normal workplace if you became unable to work from home.

If you are unable to work from home, and your workspace is COVID secure, then you should follow the guidance on travelling by public transport in the previous question.

Yes.  From the 15 June 2020, it is mandatory to wear a face covering on public transport.

Staff are encouraged to minimise their use of public transport and unnecessary journeys where possible.

Meetings that can be undertaken with colleagues or clients joining remotely via phone, Skype or Microsoft teams should replace face to face meetings wherever possible.

Where a meeting is deemed a priority and exceptionally has to continue on a face to face basis, then those attending in person must socially distance in line with guidelines.

Face Coverings

It has been mandatory to wear face coverings on public transport since the 15 June 2020, and mandatory in shops, from the 24 July 2020.  A list of other indoor settings where a face covering is required can be found here.

As you will know from a separate communication, in order to continue to ensure the health and wellbeing of our staff we have ordered 5,000 reusable/washable face coverings. Two of these face coverings will be available for each member of staff on request. Whether or not you request one of these face coverings is optional and not compulsory.

In Pinnacle offices where measures are in place to ensure social distancing can be maintained, there is no need for colleagues to wear a face covering. In situations where a Pinnacle colleague is meeting with a customer face-to-face in an enclosed space where social distancing is not possible, colleagues must wear a face covering for the duration of the meeting, e.g. in Housing Offices and Concierge settings, unless you are exempt from wearing one.

Customers should also be advised to wear a face covering when visiting any Pinnacle premises, with exemptions for those who have an age, health or disability reason.

Face coverings are not a replacement for managing risk. Minimising time spent in contact with others, social distancing and utilising remote meeting options where possible are options which need to be considered.  We will be ensuring good ventilation, increased cleaning, strict hygiene regimes and abiding by risk assessments to reduce risk further.

Face coverings are there to protect those around you. If you cough or are asymptomatic, they will help minimise the spread of the virus. Face coverings are largely intended to protect others, not the wearer, against the spread of infection because they cover the nose and mouth, which are the main confirmed sources of transmission of virus that causes coronavirus infection (COVID-19). If you require a face covering, please request one through your line manager.

Face masks on the other hand are PPE (personal protective equipment) and must be used where a risk or COSHH assessment states they are to be used.

Track and Trace

Whilst using the app is voluntary, we are encouraging all staff scan the QR code upon entering a premises wherever possible. All visitors should also be asked to register using the app when they enter a Pinnacle office or depot.

We continue to receive a number of specific questions relating to coronavirus. We will update this page with the responses as soon as we are able.  Sometimes this will require waiting for further Government guidance.   

We would encourage you to ask any further questions either directly through your line manager, or by making use of the ‘Ask Excom’ feature on the Pinnacle Group intranet.